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Tuesday, 02 September 2014

Story Homes plans 440 homes in £67 million project

Carlisle housebuilder Story Homes is leading a £67.8m redevelopment of a former hospital in Lancaster.

The scheme involves the restoration and conversion of the Grade II-listed Lancaster Moor Hospital and building up to 440 homes in the grounds, which extend to 39 acres.

Story Homes will build the majority of the new properties.

It will also draw up a masterplan for the site incorporating existing parking, green space and mature woodland.

Work is due to start this month.

Steve Errington, managing director of Story Homes, said: “This is an exciting project for us.

“It will see an area that is steeped in history brought back into use to create a quality, high specification development for which we are renowned.

“As well as regenerating the area and bringing affordable, quality, housing, the development will boost the local economy, not only in terms of jobs, but also the procurement of materials and services from local companies.”

The Government’s Homes and Communities Agency (HCA) is behind the scheme.

It describes the development as “one of the most significant” it has ever undertaken in the north west.

Outline planning permission has been granted for the new homes, and for the conversion of the former hospital and the adjoining Campbell House into apartments and houses.

The conversion will be carried out by Manchester restoration specialist PJ Livesey Group.

The HCA has worked with Lancaster City Council and English Heritage to prepare the site.

It is investing £3m through its accelerated land-disposal programme to support enabling and infrastructure works including a new access, road upgrades, demolition of outbuildings, asbestos removal and survey works.

Lancaster Moor was built in 1882 to accommodate mental-health patients.

More recently it was used by the NHS. It closed in 1999.

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