X

Cookies

Continue We want you to get the most out of using this website, which is why we and our partners use cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to receive these cookies. You can find out more about how we use cookies here.
 

Monday, 21 April 2014

Sister of killed Carlisle soldier David Murray lays cross in his memory

The youngest sister of a Cumbrian soldier killed in Afghanistan has laid a cross in his memory.

Eleanor Murray photo
Eleanor Murray lays her tribute

Courageous Eleanor Murray paid tribute to her brother, Pte David Murray, during a Remembrance service in Carlisle city centre yesterday morning.

The 13-year-old, dressed in her Trinity School uniform, was among the first group of pupils to lay tributes at the event, which saw pupils from more than 20 schools gather to remember those who have been lost or wounded while serving in wars.

Pte Murray was just 19 when he was killed by a suicide bomber in Afghanistan in 2008. His sister Eleanor, of Langdale Avenue, off Dalston Road, said: “It felt really special laying the cross, I’m so proud of him.”

She added that she had lots of ways of remembering him throughout the year.

The service was organised by the Royal British Legion ahead of the military parade that will take place on Remembrance Sunday.

Each school was represented by four pupils who joined the Mayor of Carlisle, David Wilson, and cadets in a parade through the city.

Led by a piper, they started the Tithe Barn and marched through the streets to the War Memorial at Greenmarket, outside the Old Town Hall.

Prayers was said and verses from the poem The Fallen were read out, before pupils – and the crowds who had gathered – stood in silence for two minutes.

Each school group took it in turns to lay their own poppies, wreaths and floral tributes at the memorial.

Belle Vue School was represented by four pupils who have family members who have served or are about to serve in Afghanistan – Amy Swan Graham, Rhys Ellis, Marshall Parkinson and Ellie Skelton.

Headteacher Peter Ovens said: “We were invited to come here today and felt it was right. We have quite a few children linked to the forces.

“In school we have been having a Remembrance Day and have focused on the fallen. We held a silence and talked about the word freedom. It’s important that young people understand what it is and that it was worth fighting for.

“It’s not just about how it has affected our lives but also what is happening in Afghanistan today.”

Each of the four pupils had written messages.

Marshall’s read: “Thank you for fighting for us. The world wouldn’t be the same without you.” Amy added: “Thank you for everything you have done.”

SHARE THIS ARTICLE

Vote

Is the economy recovering?

Yes

No

Show Result

Hot jobs

New vacancies

FeedWind

BBC News business headlines

FeedWind